Thracian culture


The traditional holidays, rooted deep in folklore, are more prevalent in rural Bulgaria than in the cities and tend to relate to the harvest and health. One of the most attractive rituals is the Koukeri - men disguised in animal skins and furs, wearing grotesque painted masks, do the rounds of the villages banging loud bells to ward off evil spirits and ensure a good crop. Other famous Bulgarian dance is Nestinari, which dance on burning embers to mark the beginning of summer on the feast of Saints Constantine and Elena. Even sophisticated city folk will get up at a wedding to join in the Horo - a dance in a circle to folk music.

With its more than 1300 years history the Bulgarians has inherited many archaeological monuments from the Thracian, Proto-Bulgarian and Bulgarian culture:

  • The two unique monuments of Thracian art - the tombs near Kazanluk and Sveshtari
  • Boyana Church - marking the beginnings of portrait painting in European art
  • The majestic Rila Monastery - largest in the Balkans
  • The ancient museum town of Nessebur - situated on a rocky peninsula, linked with mainland by a narrow isthmus
  • Ivanovo Rock Monasteries - a natural museum of mediaeval Bulgarian painting and many others

Bulgarian cuisine is one of the tastiest in Europe. Food is still cooked with fresh, naturally grown ingredients. It combines the wonderfully rich Ottoman influence with a peasant cooking style that uses flavor-packed vegetables and herbs. Bulgaria excels in sirene (a white salty cheese) and yogurt. The yogurt is very good and distinctive that it's exported world wide simply as Bulgarian Yogurt (Kiselo mlyako).






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