Dobrich



The remains found by archaeologists testify that there was human presence on the territory of Dobrich in antiquity and early middle ages.

The devastating Pecheneg invasions of the first third of c. 9 AD depopulated the interior of Dobrouja and the life in the settlements ceased for the whole period of the Second Bulgarian Kingdom.

In c. 14, a new settlement came into being in this crossroad area (roads from the Danube to the Black Sea and from Eastern Europe to the interior of the Balkan Peninsula passed through it). Its founder was the Turkish travelling merchant Hajioglou. In his honour and because of the important function of the town and the large food and livestock marketplace, it was named Hajioglou Pazarjik, which means "important marketplace" in Turkish.

In c. 17-19, the town developed as a crafts, commercial and agricultural centre.

Its culture took shape, its church and educational work developed, girls' education was introduced. Its town planning started in 1869.

The town was liberated from the Ottoman oppression on 27.01.1878. It was renamed to Dobrich after the medieval Dobrouja ruler Dobrotitsa with a princely decree of 19.02.1882 (Bulgaria was a principality then).

The town's development during the first decades of c. 20 was influenced by the political vicissitudes resulting from the three consecutive wars which were led by Bulgaria. The Day of the town of Dobrich is celebrated on 25 September, because on this date in 1940 the Rumanian occupation of South Dobrouja was ended and the Bulgarian army entered Dobrich.

The town bore the name of the Soviet Marshal Tolbouhin for several decades during the Communist rule. The name Dobrich was restored with a decree of the President of 19.09.1990.

Now Dobrich is one of the ten largest towns in Bulgaria - am important cultural, economic and administrative centre in the northeast economic region of the country.






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